• Why 1916 Matters

    I’m not a native, that’s right, I’m not entitled to put one of those obnoxious bumper stickers on my car. Colorado has been my home for 9 years now though. As a person who has moved around the country often, the longest I have ever lived in any one state is 13 years, so you could say that Colorado is my second home.

    Over that past 9 years, I have developed a deep appreciation for our state. It is filled with some of the most beautiful scenery on the planet. The people that inhabit this state are filled with passion for all things Colorado. So, it occurred to me that it was time for Renegade to pay tribute to Colorado through what we do best, beer.

    The first in our series of Colorado historical beer is our 1916 Colorado Lager. Why is 1916 important? Well, CO actually entered prohibition four years prior to the rest of the country, a black mark in our history to be sure. Prohibition went into effect at midnight on New Year’s Eve 1915. The honor of being the first arrested for public drunkenness went to either John Hanson or Charles Robbins depending on whether you read the Denver Post or the Rocky Mountain News. Either way, we like to think these fellas may have tipped back a few lagers like our 1916. We thought the year should be honored in our brew as the first time a couple of guys flipped the bird to prohibition 17 long years before it was repealed.

    Lagers were the predominant beer style at the time. Denver beer culture was heavily German influenced in the early days of the city. However, American lagers were distinctive in their addition of a premium ingredient, flaked corn.

    We have done our best to recreate what we think a lager brewed in Denver at the time would have been like. Our 1916 lager is based on a German Dortmunder beer. The water would have been fresh from the Rockies and full of minerals prior to modern water filtration and treatment systems, so we added minerals to our water to simulate the water composition. Lastly, we added premium flaked corn for a truly American experience (no not mashed corn like the macro brewers, settle down).

    Now here comes the best part. We will be serving this tasty brew in a 20oz mug because sometimes you just want a big mug of lager! When my twins were born a few months back, they spent three weeks in the NICU. It was a stressful time and when my wife and I would get home late at night after spending the day with them we would split three cans of beer between two 20oz mugs that we have at home. I realized the beauty of the big mug during this time. So, if you like this idea, you have my children Emmett and Gracie to thank. If you don’t like the idea well, I feel sorry for you.  Who doesn’t like a big beer?

    Look for this beer to hit our taps and local restaurants around Halloween and become a staple in the Renegade line. Also, we are already planning our next Colorado historical beer so stay tuned for that.

    Cheers to Colorado and cheers to beer in Colorado. I look forward to clinking mugs with you in celebration of our state.

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